Oba Definition in Textile

Optical brighteners (OBAs) can cause serious errors in color evaluation and therefore in color fastness evaluation. PCLs are generally used to improve the whiteness of a textile. They convert ultraviolet light into a wavelength in the visible spectrum. Most PCLs used to enhance the whitening effect of a textile emit light in the blue spectrum, as most cream colors reflect higher in the red/yellow end of the spectrum. Adding blue to a white with a red/yellow base flattens the reflection curve, making the color whiter. Adding an OBA to a colored color changes the observed color. This market is being driven by increasing demand in the optical brighteners market in Asia Pacific, which is expected to grow by 5.4% during the forecast period owing to the rapid increase in demand for optical brighteners in the cleaning and textile industries in the region. 4) Other industries: In addition to the detergent, paper and textile industries, there are other industries where optical brighteners suppliers supply OBAs. Unlike the industries mentioned above, these industries take advantage of the brightening property of brighteners. The plastics industry, the paint industry and the cosmetics industry are the main examples. PCLs affect color and how it is perceived, both with the naked eye in natural light and when color is acutely affected by the light source in which it is finally seen after manufacturing. For merchandisers and retailers around the world, this is a major problem when multiple products are purchased via a color palette for in-store presentation. There is currently no standardization for LED lighting, for example, and as such, the color of an approved printed garment may appear in a different shade when manufactured in the retail store.

Caption: PCLs affect color and how it is perceived, both with the naked eye in natural light and acutely through the light source in which it is seen. The theme of the ABO is fashion, sportswear, events and the interior design industry. With the right knowledge, communication and lighting specifications, the problem of print production can be easily solved. However, facts are rarely communicated between printers, print buyers and end users (often not yet defined) and are therefore difficult to control. So why does the textile industry use OBAs? During the bleaching and drying process, the whiteness of the fabric can often be improved by adding an optical brightener (OBA). Optical brighteners (OBAs) are chemicals that are added to textiles during equipment bleaching and use the fluorescence process to trick your eyes into thinking your fabrics are whiter and shinier than they actually are. These additives are often used to improve the appearance of fabric and paper color, resulting in a “whitening effect”. They make yellow/orange materials less visible by compensating for the deficit of blue and violet light reflected by the material with the blue and violet optical emission of the fluorophore (fluorescent chemical compound). PCLs absorb light in the ultraviolet and violet range (usually 340-370 nm) of the electromagnetic spectrum and emit light in the blue range (usually 420-470 nm) by fluorescence. Caption: This is the electromagnetic spectrum. It starts on the far left with gamma rays and moves to the right through X-rays, microwaves and radio waves. The only part that people can see with the naked eye is the visible spectrum above, unless PCLs are used.

Image source: WIKIPEDIA. This is the electromagnetic spectrum. It starts on the far left with gamma rays and moves to the right through X-rays, microwaves and radio waves. The only part that people can see with the naked eye is the spectrum visible above, unless PCL is applied. PCLs absorb some of the invisible ultraviolet rays and emit them as blue light. It is this reflected blue light that makes fabrics brighter and whiter. ABLs are often used by commission stands and fabric finishers to improve the whiteness of the textile and adapt the visual appearance of the final fabric to customer expectations and whiteness standards. Caption: Different brands of OBA have a wide variation in color reflectivity, and the reflective properties vary from manufacturer to manufacturer and concentration to concentration, all these fluxes affect the printed color and how it is perceived. Image source: WIKIPEDIA. However, there is no normalization, so the variance cannot be clearly defined. Different brands of chemical ABLs have wide variation in color reflectivity, and reflective properties vary from manufacturer to manufacturer and concentration to concentration.

Obas can penetrate and distort the color space reached by the digital printer in production. It follows that when the color space is shifted by an OBA, the actual color printed by the digital printer is distorted. Above all, the source of the fabric and the preparation for digital printing must be consistent, and any PCL to be used must be understood, defined and specified from the outset, as variations in PCL are the main cause of deviation and waste of printing inks. It is easy to detect the presence of optical brighteners under black ultraviolet light. Fabrics and detergents with more PCL appear brighter than those with less. Although fabric prints containing different PCLs may look similar, they will look different under artificial light sources containing more UV light. Manufacturers who assemble outfits with different pieces of fabric printed from different suppliers can have significant differences, because although the pieces of fabric may match general light, these colors can change under UV light sources to achieve complete color deviation. Manufacturers of the chemicals used often develop PCLs specifically to target specific tissue types. In terms of revenue, the global optical brighteners market is huge and is expected to grow at a CAGR of 4.9% from 2018 to 2026 (in addition to the expected growth of digital textile printing) and is expected to reach $2,036 million by 2026 (Transparency Market Research) ABO supply is readily available for cellulose fibers such as cotton and synthetic fibers such as polyamide worldwide.

but without standardization. There are many manufacturers and brands and a large variance in costs. Each product has different light emitting properties, and all are available in a wide range of compatibilities from a fiber type to a fiber type. In summary, the influence of an OBA on the final color obtained by the digital printer cannot be overstated. If the concentration varies during a print run or if the OBP manufacturer changes from batch to batch, the profiling that the printer previously performed on the fabric is worthless and the print service provider must create a new profile before starting production. Ensuring the security of supply of the digital textile printer by maintaining the continuity of the textile whiteness equation (without the possibility of variation) is essential and must be taken into account when defining the supply chain for all digitally printed textiles. About 400 types of brighteners are listed in the international Colour Index database,[4] but fewer than 90 are commercially produced, and only a handful are commercially important.